2017 Bazaar Grant Recipients

The Trinity Bazaar is a tradition of the cathedral celebrating its 69th anniversary this year. Lots of changes have taken place over the years with today’s Bazaar featuring a diverse array of foods; crafts; and “gently used” books, clothes and other merchandise that early Bazaar chairs might be surprised to see.
 
One thing that hasn’t changed, however, is the fact that all of the funds raised go directly to community organizations.

“As far as we know, the Trinity Bazaar is the only church festival in town that dedicates all of its proceeds directly to the community organizations we select,” said Elizabeth Wyman, who was responsible for the grant selection committee this year. “It’s clear our support is making a difference by the continued increase in applications we receive every year.”

For the 2017 Bazaar, these community organizations will receive Bazaar funding:

  • Lighthouse of Life.  Domestic violence sex trafficking isn’t a crime that makes the news on a daily basis, but incidents are growing in South Carolina. The National Human Trafficking Hotline reports calls from South Carolina more than doubled between 2012 and 2016. Lighthouse for Life is opening Karis House as a refuge for girls 12 – 21 who have been rescued from sex trafficking in South Carolina. Bazaar funds will be used to renovate and maintain Karis House, which will be one of the first state-approved safe houses for victims of this crime.
  • Fresh Start.  A recreation center in the Waverly neighborhood that had fallen into disrepair is taking on a new life as  part of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church’s Fresh Start Ministry Bazaar grant funds will help provide free laundry service, showers, HIV testing and blood pressure screening to homeless and working  poor. The services are offered every Thursday and two Saturdays each month.
  • Free Medical Clinic.  Patients who have no health insurance and can’t pay for medical services have been using the services of the Free Medical Clinic since 1984. Bazaar funding will allow the clinic to purchase equipment that will help diagnose and treat skin disorders. Currently patients who need specialty care for skin lesions, precancerous conditions or other skin disorders must be referred elsewhere for treatment. Adding on-site dermatology treatment with this new equipment will allow patients to be treated on-site, bringing to eleven the number of onsite specialties the clinic offers.
  • Keeping it Real Ministries.  Backpacks are a staple of life for people living on the street. Typically a backpack lasts about six months. Bazaar grant funds will help with costs associated with two events Keeping it Real Ministries sponsors to provide backpacks, clothes and toiletries for people living on the street. The events, held in April and November, feature hot meal, music and community worship service. These programs have served an increasing number of people at each event with more than 400 backpacks being distributed at the most recent event.
  • Growing Home Southeast.  Studies have shown that at-risk children, youth and families thrive when they live in an environment that not only provides stable housing but also supportive services to meet the needs of residents. Growing Home Southeast provides housing at Leaphart Place, a 20-unit housing complex, for young adults (18-28) who have aged out of the foster care system. Bazaar funding will support rental subsidies for residents.