The South Transept

16A.1862 Window (1862):

At some point in time, a broom/tool closet had been installed between the original staircase and the wall. During the restoration of the Cathedral (2008-2011), the removal of this closet and the moving of the staircase revealed the only remaining window that had been installed in the expansion of the church in 1861-1862.  This window is not stained glass but “Victorian painted glass.” Shenandoah Glass Co. of Irmo, SC, repaired and restored the window. According to Wilson Farrell (architectural engineer in charge of the restoration) in addition to cleaning and repairs, “One of the panes had to be replaced—the particular panel was so well done by Shenandoah that it is indistinguishable from the rest of the window.”

16.The Diocesan Window (1977):

This rose window, a companion to the rose window in the north transept, is called the Diocesan window  and was installed after Trinity became the Cathedral Parish of the Diocese of Upper South Carolina. The petals radiate outward from the oculus of the window, which shows the sun setting behind a mountain, illustrating the motto of the Diocese of Upper South Carolina, “I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills,” Psalm 121:1

With each petal the circular form of the image represents a shield, symbolizing the protection of God.  The shields in the petals of this and other rose windows represent the protection of God. On each shield is an image of God from Psalm 121. Clockwise from the one o’clock position:

  • The keeper of mankind, “My help cometh from the Lord,” expressed by the hands of God and man.
  • The maker of heaven, “My help cometh from the LORD, which made heaven and earth," expressed by stars, comet, and galaxy
  • The maker of earth, expressed by the earth and the moon.
  • The protector of man asleep, “he that keepeth thee will not slumber,” expressed by a shield above a sleeping man
  • The protector of man at work, “he that keepeth Israel shall neither slumber nor sleep,” expressed by a shield above a working man
  • The protector of man at worship, “the LORD is they shade upon thy right hand,” expressed by a shield above a man at prayer.
  • The protector by day, “The sun shall not smite thee by day,” expressed by the sun over a field.
  • The protector at night, “nor the moon by night,” expressed by the moon and three stars over a house.
  • The protection of God, “The LORD shall preserve thee from all evil,” expressed by the shield of the Lord above.
  • The going out, “The LORD shall preserve thy going out,” expressed by a thatched mission church.
  • The coming in, “and thy coming in,” expressed by a simple home.
  • The giver of eternity to man, “from this time forth , and even for evermore,” expressed by the symbols of resurrection—the cross and two Easter lilies.

The window was designed by Columbia attorney Augustus T. Graydon (1916-2007), a life-long active member of Trinity, and Crosby Willet of the Willet Studios, who created the window.

MEMORIAL: THIS WINDOW WAS GIVEN BY THE STATE-RECORD FOUNDATION TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN MEMORY OF THE GONZALES FAMILY WHO SERVED THE CATHEDRAL AND THE STATE SO FAITHFULLY.

17.Saint Peter (1968):

In the upper portion, two angels bear a shield with gold and silver keys saltire (crossed

diagonally). The keys refer to Matthew 16:19, where Jesus said to Peter, “I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.” The colors gold and silver refer to heaven and earth.

In the center, Peter holds an open book in his left hand, which usually refers to the word of God, and a staff in his right hand.

In the lower portion, a cock crows—an image from Matthew 26:75,  “Before the cock crow, thou shalt deny me thrice.” Behind the cock is the inverted cross, on which Peter is said to have been crucified, deeming himself unworthy of being crucified in the same position as Jesus, according to the apocryphal “Acts of Peter.”

Peter is also depicted in Windows ## 21, 25, 26, 38, & G. Trinity is modeled after the Church of St. Peter in York, England.

This window, a companion to the St. Paul Window (#9) in the north transept, was produced by Powell and Sons/Whitefriars.

DEDICATION: “IN LOVING MEMORY OF THE RT. REV. CLARENCE ALFRED COLE D.D., BISHOP OF UPPER SOUTH CAROLINA1953-1963. BORN 1909 DIED 1963”

MEMORIAL: THE SAINT PETER WINDOW WAS GIVEN IN LOVING MEMORY OF THE RIGHT REVEREND CLARENCE ALFRED COLE, D.D., BISHOP OF UPPER SOUTH CAROLINA, 1953-1963, BY THE CONGREGATION OF TRINITY CHURCH. BISHOP COLE IS INTERRED IN THE CHURCHYARD.

18&19.The Prophets Isaiah and Jeremiah (1975):

This pair of lancets depict Old Testament prophets and correspond with ##11 & 12 in the north transept.Their arches are obscured in the church by a balcony support, but the obscured portion contains no pictorial subjects.

Jeremiah (right lancet), the ninth of the prophets is generally believed to be the author of the Book of Jeremiah, 1 Kings, 2 Kings, and the Book of Lamentations and is cited in the New Testament (Hebrews 8:8-12; 10.16-17). He lived in the late 7th century BC, some 60 years after the death of Isaiah. He correctly predicted the fall of Jerusalem and the destruction of Solomon’s Temple (Jeremiah 38:2). He was persecuted by his family, priests, and the princes of Judah, who threw him into a cistern, depicted at the top of this window, atop palm leaves, symbols of rejoicing.

Jeremiah is shown holding a stone. Tradition says he was stoned to death by the Jews in Egypt because of his unpopular messages against the rebellious Israelites.

Isaiah (left lancet) was a prophet who lived in the Kingdom of Judah in the 8-7th centuries B.C. when Assyria conquered the Kingdom of Israel, Judah’s northern neighbor. Judah allied itself with the Assyrians, lest its chief city, Jerusalem fall. Isaiah 37:1-23 tells of Isaiah’s prophecy to Judah’s king Hezekiah that God would visit His wrath on the invaders. The Assyrians lost 185,000 men and the king never attacked Judah again. (2 Kings 19; 2 Chronicles 32) Isaiah is best known for his “Song of the Suffering Servant,” (Isaiah 52:13-53:12), widely taken by Christians as a prophecy of the coming of the nature, suffering, and death of Jesus Christ. According to John 12:41, Isaiah “saw [Jesus’] glory and spake of him.”      

Isaiah is here portrayed holding a saw. The Talmud (Yevamot 49b) and the Muslim tradition record that after the death of Hezekiah the unrighteous Israelites had Isaiah executed by being sawn in half  (as was the Apostle James the Lesser), but there is no Christian authority for this.

The top of the window shows the scroll on which he recorded his prophecies, and a pair of tongs with which a seraph placed on Isaiah’s lips to purge him of his sins. (Isaiah 6.5-7)

The Willet Studio executed these two lancet windows.

DEDICATION: TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN LOVING MEMORY OF 1896 JANE TUCKER FISHER DANA 1972 AND IN LOVING MEMORY OF 1890  FRANCIS JOHNSTONE DANA 1981

MEMORIAL:  THIS WINDOW WAS GIVEN TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN LOVING MEMORY OF JANE TUCKER DANA (1896-1872) AND FRANCIS JOHNSTONE DANA (1890-1981) BY FRANK J. DANA, FRANK J. DANA JR., AND ANNE DANA BEACH.